Friday, February 24, 2012

Bui Legal wages war against marijuana

Cameroon - By Tume Humfrey Vernyuy - The State Counsel for Bui, Justice Taminang Ignatius, will use the heavy arm of the law to stop the cultivation, consumption and commercialization of marijuana that is on the rise in the Division. He took this commitment on 18 January 2012 in the State Council Chambers, shortly after a large quantity of fresh off- rooted Indian hemp was brought in from Dzeng village in Nkum Sub Division.
According to the learned state counsel, the cultivation and consumption of Indian hemp was on the rise, and always at the source of criminal activities such as theft, assaults and many more. He regretted that youths and some unscrupulous mature persons were consuming drugs, that often ended up “sapping their memories” and after sometimes, such persons get into mental disorder and cause disturbances. 
To him, most criminals consumed the drug to gain some boldness before going out for criminal activities. “The drug”, Justice Taminang Ignatius stated, “is dangerous to the health of the consumers and the society at large. This justifies why the law is very harsh. As to the penalties reserved for consumers, their imprisonment term is up to 10 years… for those who trade in Indian hemp, the offence is felonious and the punishment is from ten years and above,” he stated. This, according to him, is done to deter and prevent society from any unreasonable risk or harm. While calling on the people to stay away from cultivation, consumption and commercialization of Indian hemp, he promised that the legal department would not relent in its effort to prosecute and punish any suspect or culprit in conformity with the law.
This conversation was ignited by the uprooted Indian hemp, that was uprooted from Dzeng village in Nkum Sub Division by elements of the Kumbo Gendarmarie Brigade in the presence of a bailiff and the deputy state counsel for Bui division that same day. According to the State Counsel, the suspect, whose name cannot be mentioned because the case is still sub judis, is now gnashing his teeth in the Kumbo Principal Prison, while awaiting trial.
According to our sources, the suspect reportedly manhandled three sheep for destroying tomatoes in his farm in a valley at Dzeng, belonging to a certain Abdullah- Vicky. The owner reportedly informed the legal department and elements of law and order went for investigations. To their utter dismay, they discovered that even though there was tomato in the farm, it was more of a marijuana plantation. As a result, the State Counsel ordered a locus comprised of law officers, a bailiff and the deputy state counsel, who went and uprooted as much as the vehicle could carry. A government hospital is expected to confirm the identity of the plant.


©2011 The Vanguard Cameroon, Bamenda. A publication of Media World. All rights reserved.  All are welcome to comment. Leave a comment, speak your mind and take part in any discussion. As exchange of ideas and debates between opinions are fundamental for our democracy. And will push Cameroon forward. Comments with racist, homophobic, sexist, hateful, extreme Christian or extreme Islamic content will be removed. Leave the CAPS-LOCK off, no reason to SHOUT.

Monday, February 20, 2012

Cameroon Schools in Dire Need of French and English Teachers

By Mua Patrick - Students and pupils of both private and state-owned institutions, Friday February 3, converge on the premises of Bilingual Grammar School, Molyko, Buea, to commemorate activities marking the 10th edition of the national day of Bilingualism under the auspices of the Secretary General in the Ministry of Secondary Education, Professor Leke Tambo Ivo. Through songs, sketches, drama and debates, the students demonstrated their ability and skills in bilingualism, with the focal point being “bilingualism for a responsible citizenship”.
The Secretary General in the Ministry of Secondary Education commended all actors for their contribution towards government policy of enhancing national integration through the effective use of English and French in schools. On this note, Prof Leke Tambo called on stakeholders in the education sector not relent in their efforts, but rather to step up strategies to ensure that Bilingualism becomes a tool of interaction for students and pupils in schools across the country.
On his part, the regional inspector in change Bilingualism used the occasion to appeal to government for the recruitment of more English and French teachers who, according to him, are insufficient to meet the needs of the students. He added that out of the 215 public secondary schools in the region with a student population of 1 254 91 students, the number of French and English teachers is just 250, which gives a student /teacher ratio of 1 teacher to 500 students. Worth mentioning is the fact that this year’s edition is being commemorated against the backdrop of some 25 schools not having French teachers.
Speaking equally during the event the host principal, Madame Lois Ikome, disclosed that they are in dire need of French and English teachers. In a school of 3.300 students, they are six and thirteen French and English teachers respectively.


©2011 The Vanguard Cameroon, Bamenda. A publication of Media World. All rights reserved.  All are welcome to comment. Leave a comment, speak your mind and take part in any discussion. As exchange of ideas and debates between opinions are fundamental for our democracy. And will push Cameroon forward. Comments with racist, homophobic, sexist, hateful, extreme Christian or extreme Islamic content will be removed. Leave the CAPS-LOCK off, no reason to SHOUT.

Friday, February 17, 2012

Bulu Blind Trainees Want Director Sacked


By Mua Patrick in Buea - Trainees of the Rehabilitation Centre for the Blind, better still Bulu Blind Centre as it is fondly called, angrily went to the streets  of Mile 16, Buea, Saturday February 4 for what they termed’ inhuman treatment” by officials  of the centre, most especially the Director, Mr. Fomenky Nicodemus. The mass protest that lasted for over  two hours interrupted traffic into and out of the town of Buea, particularly around the mile 16 neighbourhood, some of the trainees slackly when into the streets chanting songs, calling on government to come to their aid, it was thanks to the kind intervention of the DO of Buea Abraham Chekem, accompanied by the social affairs delegate, that the situation was temporally calmed with a plea for restraint.
In an enlarged meeting that brought together trainees of the centre and some members of the administrative staff, the trainees one after the other aired out most of their grievances and advocated for immediate remedial action to be taken. Issues like the poor nature of their meals, torture of trainees by teachers, lack of collaboration between the teachers and the trainees and, above all, the violation of trainees’ fundamental human rights were tabled before the DO in the presence of the regional delegate for social affairs, Mr. Asongtia Valentine.
According to one of the trainees, Nebuta Agatha, since the appointment of Mr. Fomenky Nicodemus as the director of the centre they have experienced nothing but semi-hell. She added: “We are suffering too much since the new Director came. There has been no collaboration between our Director and us. If the Director doesn’t leave I will go and lie on the road for a vehicle to run over me.” For others, their main worry is the bizarre attitude of a sports coordinator whose name The Vanguard got as Madame Harriett. She is alleged to be arrogant in her behavior, unfit to teach in a centre that takes care of the blind.
To resolve the matter logically, Abraham Chekem called a crisis meeting in the Director’s office that lasted 5 minutes, after which meeting some decisions were arrived at, such as the instant suspension and transfer of the said Madame Harriet and consistent visit to the school by social affairs officials to ensure the welfare of the trainees. The DO went further to give a personal donation of 50 000 FRS plus 20 000 from the delegate for a sumptuous meal to be prepared for the trainees.
The Director, on his part, accepted most of the allegations and promised that things will never be the same. As per his expulsion from the centre, the DO said he was appointed by the minister, and it is only the minister has a say in that situation. The trainees left the hall totally satisfied as they chanted songs of victory and shook hands with each other.


©2011 The Vanguard Cameroon, Bamenda. A publication of Media World. All rights reserved.  All are welcome to comment. Leave a comment, speak your mind and take part in any discussion. As exchange of ideas and debates between opinions are fundamental for our democracy. And will push Cameroon forward. Comments with racist, homophobic, sexist, hateful, extreme Christian or extreme Islamic content will be removed. Leave the CAPS-LOCK off, no reason to SHOUT.

Monday, February 13, 2012

Coup charges against writer dropped, still faces military tribunal

Press release from Writers In Prison, PEN-International. WiPC/IFEX - The Writers in Prison Committee (WiPC) of PEN International is relieved by reports that the coup charges against the writer and political activist Enoh Meyomesse have been dropped, but we remain deeply concerned that he still faces trial before a military tribunal on charges of armed robbery. There have been worrying allegations that the evidence against him is fabricated and PEN is seeking more information regarding these claims. 

Enoh Meyomesse, 57, is the author of numerous books and is a founding member of the Cameroon Writers Association. He was arrested on 22 November 2011 and charged, alongside three other men, with 1) attempting to organise a coup 2) possessing a firearm 3) aggravated theft. Meyomesse denies all charges and maintains that he is being held because of views expressed in his writings, and for his political activism. 
In late January, it was reported that the charge of organising a coup had been dropped, but that the robbery charge was still in place. Meyomesse is currently in the over-crowded Kondengui Central Prison in Yaoundé, where he will be held for at least six months while the government conducts its investigation. 
There are reports that the prosecution has fabricated evidence, and that Meyomesse has been denied proper access to legal representation, but, due to a lack of further information, PEN International is unable to take a position on the charges against him at this time. However, we are extremely concerned by the Cameroonian authorities’ unwillingness to allow Meyomesse fair conditions in which to mount a proper defence in an open court.
PLEASE SEND APPEALS:
• Calling for Meyomesse to receive a fair and open trial in a civilian court; 
• Expressing serious concern that Meyomesse has been denied proper access to a lawyer, and that his lawyer has been denied access to the full facts of the charges against his client, breaching Cameroon’s obligations under the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. 
Write to: 
President Paul Biya 
Fax: +237 22 22 08 70 
Messages may also be sent via the Presidency’s website: http://www.prc.cm/index_fr.php?link=messenger/write_pr 
Hon. Minister of Justice Laurent Esso 
Ministry of Justice 
Yaoundé, Cameroon 
Fax: +237 22 23 00 05 
Mr. Philemon Yang, Prime Minister 
Fax: +237 22 23 57 35 
Email: spm@spm.gov.cm 
Please copy appeals to the diplomatic representative for Cameroon in your country if possible. 
Details of some Cameroonian embassies can be seen here: http://embassy.goabroad.com/embassies-of/cameroon 
***Please send appeals immediately. Check with PEN International if sending appeals after 24 March 2012*** 
SOURCE:
Brownlow House 
50-51 High Holborn 
London WC1V 6ER 
United Kingdom 
wipc (@) pen-international.org 
Phone: +44 20 74050338 
Fax: +44 20 74050339

Fon Deplores unproductive cultural Practices

By Nyassah Julius - Fon Vubangsi Benjamin has deplored some of the cultural practices that perturb social and economic development. Apart from the fact that some of the traditions and cultural heritage are antiquated and pose serious impediments to social cohesion and rural development, some are noted for gross abuse of Human Rights and freedoms,  he said.


The Fon’s decision to scrap some of the anti-development cultural practices was highly solemnized by some of his subjects The Vanguard accosted to comment on the activities of their new Fon, compared to the diseased Fon Vubangsi Vugha Simon who was brutally roasted by some of his subjects because of his social misdeeds.
Some of the natives deplored some aspects of the ancient cultural heritage.still observed in most parts of the Northwest. Some of the practices hamper economic development as it scares the active population from the villages.
It is apparently against this backdrop that the Fon of Banbanki who recently gained recognition by the administration as a Second class Fon promised to put an end to some of the cultural practices noted for anti-development and abuse of Human Rights and social cohesion as well.
Speaking to the Vanguard recently upon reception of the recognition documents from the Ministry of Territorial Administration, Fon  Vubangsi promised to start up with the gender balance.
He disclosed that prior to his era; it was a taboo for the female child to succeed her father. That not withstanding, it was seditious as per the culture for a girl to partake in the funeral of her dead father if she was not married. “I will put an end to all of these to enable the girl child have her rightful place in my village.” He is also expected to address cases of forceful belonging to secret societies dreaded by most youths today for its mystics.
It should be recalled most traditional and cultural practices of this  region go with mystics, and subjects who abrogate or  decline certain offers by secret societies like the “kwifon” end up being cursed , forcing victims to escape from their villages of origin.
The fon promised to gradually put an end to bad cultural practices that perturb social well being of his subjects.
The Vanguard was told by one of the subjects that the worst form cultural heritage of most villages of the Northwest is the “kwifor”, a secret society noted for mystical deeds and destruction of subjects who refuse to join or succeed their parents.
He told this reporter that most villages of Donga Mantung, Bui and Mezam Division are noted for such cultural practices. He said most youths who reject the offers go on self exile for until a different person is crowned in their place. In a situation where no replacement is made, the crown remains vacant until the person who has been destined to occupy the throne comes back. Most girls who dread such positions go prostituting or serving as house helps in big towns, where they can not be easily identified while the male pick up mean jobs for survival. 
Meantime, the most unfortunate ones are cursed with insanity, our source narrated . He recollected the story of a certain Frederick Asongyen Fulu of Bambili village who is alleged to have escaped the village because of one such incident.
He told The Vanguard that Federick was destined to succeed his father, a certain Paul Fulu in the “Kwifon” society after his death. His father Paul Fulu reportedly died on 28th November 2010 and Federick as per the cultural norms had to take his place both in the “kwifon” secret society and the entire family. 
A few days after the funeral on 10th January 2011, Asongyen smelled doom and vamoosed to an unknown destination till date. His mother is reportedly being attacked by some members of the Kwifon on grounds that she masterminded the escape of her son Asongyen. Some of those secret societies are noted for very awful rituals that most modern or educated youths may not admire, The Vanguard was informed.
He cited titles like “Shey”, in Bui Division and a “Tanto Nwerong” in Donga Mantung Division. These classes of notables most often stay with the Fon in the palace to chart village traditional future and the “kwifon” that serves as the custodian of the village. In this regard, their activities are limited within the confines of the village, he narrated .His mother is reportedly being harassed for concealing her son, The Vanguard gathered.
Until some of these excesses of cultural heritage are checked, most youths targeted by the secret societies will continue to flee the villages for the cities. 



©2011 The Vanguard Cameroon, Bamenda. A publication of Media World. All rights reserved.  All are welcome to comment. Leave a comment, speak your mind and take part in any discussion. As exchange of ideas and debates between opinions are fundamental for our democracy. And will push Cameroon forward. Comments with racist, homophobic, sexist, hateful, extreme Christian or extreme Islamic content will be removed. Leave the CAPS-LOCK off, no reason to SHOUT.

Monday, February 6, 2012

Cameroon economy stagnated by bad governance


Cameroon - Earlier this year, two western African countries held presidential elections. On the surface, they have little in common -- one country recently emerged from a brutal civil war and has an abysmal economy; the other has been peaceful for decades and enjoys abundant revenue streams.   And yet both Liberia and Cameroon are classic stories of wasted potential.

Amid widespread allegations of electoral fraud, incumbent president Paul Biya was named winner of the Cameroon elections and Liberian incumbent Ellen Johnson Sirleaf victorious  in Liberia's runoff elections. But the two are poised to provide strikingly different kinds of leadership to their troubled countries. 

This strikingly diverse land, the curve under the African crook, has enjoyed political stability for decades. What's more, it enjoys significant natural resources, not least the oil and gas reserves that constitute roughly 30% of government revenues.

Naturally,  Cameroon's economy would dwarf Liberia's. But look a little closer, and a very different picture of lost potential comes into focus. With "one of the best-endowed primary commodity economies in sub-Saharan Africa," Cameroon also received over $35 billion in foreign aid during Biya's rule. And yet Cameroon's GDP remains unimpressive, overly dependent on commodity prices, and currently lagging behind the average developing sub-Saharan country (per capita). In its "lower-middle income" country peer group, as defined by the World Bank, Cameroon's per capita GDP is fully one-third lower than the average.

"Given its oil resources, Cameroon could be one of the richest countries in Sub-Saharan Africa," stated a 2009 Oxford University study. Instead, it noted, "Cameroon has become an example of growth collapse." The study makes the stunning assertion that 54% of total oil revenues in Cameroon between 1997 and 2006 are potentially unaccounted for in the national budget. The culprit?  "Poor governance."

Since 1982, Cameroon has been ruled by a one-man presidential show, the secretive bureaucrat Paul Biya, 78. Routinely ranked among the most corrupt countries in the world, Cameroon has also achieved a "Not Free" rating from Freedom House's political rights survey, grouping it with such continental all-stars as Somalia, Sudan, Zimbabwe and the DRC.

At least Ellen Johnson Sirleaf can blame a civil war for her country's stagnation. Paul Biya has had 30 years to capitalize on Cameroon's many economic and social advantages, with little to show for it. Just consider the following areas where Liberia -- its population, infrastructure, and institutions recently devastated by a 14-year war -- outstrips Cameroon. Issues affecting the private sector, the engine of growth in a healthy economy are. Source: World Bank Enterprise Surveys, 2009

But apparently Biya does not consider these statistics troubling enough to require much of his attention. Cameroon's president can be found as often in Europe as in his official residence in Yaoundé, once blowing through $40,000 a day on 43 hotel rooms during a vacation in France. (As a little side note, 40 percent of Cameroon's population lives below the poverty line).

This year, after doctoring election laws to favour his own victory (having altered the constitution in 2008 to abolish term limits), Biya ran a notably lackadaisical campaign. He must have taken to heart what many election observers have pointed out over the years - that the deeply flawed presidential elections in Cameroon are basically a foregone conclusion.

Too often in Africa, “We focus on the wars, the epidemics, the genocidal dictators. But Cameroon has killed its potential the quiet way - through years of mismanagement, corruption and abuse. All the while, Western nations cut aid checks and conduct cheerful business with this most refreshing oasis of political stability. Considering that both Sirleaf and Biya will likely continue in office the next few years, perhaps we should be more selective in our assistance. Whom would you rather receive your foreign aid tax dollars: the leaders trying to lift their countries out of trouble, or those who inflicted it in the first place?” Intimate source of IMF hinted the Vanguard.


©2012 The Vanguard Cameroon, Bamenda. A publication of Media World. All rights reserved.  All are welcome to comment. Leave a comment, speak your mind and take part in any discussion. As exchange of ideas and debates between opinions are fundamental for our democracy. And will push Cameroon forward. Comments with racist, homophobic, sexist, hateful, extreme Christian or extreme Islamic content will be removed. Leave the CAPS-LOCK off, no reason to SHOUT.